Islands 

The Maltese archipelago lies virtually at the centre of the Mediterranean, 93 km south of Sicily and 288 km north of Africa.

The archipelago consists of three islands: Malta, Gozo andComino with a total population of over 400,000 inhabitants occupying an area of 316 square kilometers.

Malta is the largest island and the cultural, commercial and administrative centre.

Gozo is the second largest island and is more rural, characterised by fishing, tourism, crafts and agriculture.

Comino, the smallest of the trio, has one hotel and is largely uninhabited.
Malta
Malta is the largest island and the cultural, commercial and administrative centre.

Here you can span the millennia with an astonishing array ofthings to discover. And wherever you go, the scenery and architecture provide a spectacular backdrop. The colours are striking, honey-coloured stone against the deepest of Mediterranean blues.
Malta has been described as one big open-air museum. What makes it unique is that so much of the past is visible today. Delve into the island’s mysterious prehistory, retrace the footsteps of St. Paul or see where the Knights of St. John fought their most famous battles.
Malta is holidaying as the mood takes you. And with near year-round sun, you can indulge in outdoor living at its best.
In just a kilometre or two, you can try a new sport, laze on an island cruise and tour the most important historic sites, and still have time to join in the nightlife. That’s the real advantage of a stay here.
The island offers plenty of specialist holidays for those seeking to brush up their English, learn a new skill, discover history or get fit. If you’re interested in sports, there’s enough on offer to satisfy the seasoned enthusiast as well as the casual first-timer. Malta has wellness and spa facilities at the luxury hotels and club resorts. Sea and land lend themselves to activities from rock-climbing to gentle rambling.
And, if this were not enough, there are the other two islands -Gozo and Comino -which can be a pleasant change-of-scene during your stay on the mainland or alternative destinations in themselves. The choice is yours…

Gozo
Gozo is known to provide a tranquil haven for a tempo and scene change. The charm of Malta’s sister Island is immediately apparent; it’s greener, more rural and smaller, with life’s rhythms dictated by the seasons, fishing and agriculture.
Steeped in myth, Gozo is thought to be the legendary Calypso’s isle of Homer’s Odyssey – a peaceful, mystical backwater. Baroque churches and old stone farmhouses dot the countryside. Gozo’s rugged landscape and spectacular coastline await exploration with some of the Mediterranean’s best dive sites.
The island also comes complete with historical sites, forts and amazing panoramas, as well as one of the archipelago’s best-preserved prehistoric temples, Ġgantija.
Gozo also possesses a nightlife and cultural calendar all of its own, with some great dining out.

Comino
Situated between Malta and Gozo, the smaller island of Comino is a paradise for snorkelers, divers, windsurfers and ramblers.
Only 3.5 square kilometers, Comino is car-free and apart from one hotel, is virtually uninhabited.
The island’s main attraction is the Blue Lagoon. In summer, this sheltered inlet of shimmering aquamarine water over white sand is very popular with day-trippers. Other beaches on the island include Santa Marija Bay and San Niklaw Bay.
Comino is also worth a visit in winter, and is ideal for walkers and photographers. With no urban areas or cars on the island, one can easily smell the scent of wild thyme and other herbs.

Comino was inhabited in the Roman period, but did not have much significance until the Knights arrived. It then had a dual role: hunting grounds and a staging post in the defence of the Maltese Islands against the Ottoman Turks.
The island had proved a useful base for pirates operating in the central Mediterranean and, though stark and barren today, it was home to wild boar and hares when the Knights arrived in 1530. The Grandmasters went to great lengths to ensure that their game on Comino was protected: anyone found breaking the embargo on hunting could expect to serve three years rowing on a galley.
After WWII, Comino remained a backwater until its fortunes revived with tourism in the mid-1960s.
Where to Stay
Comino has one resort hotel, which is ideal for those looking for a tranquil getaway.
Suggestions